Archived posts from category ‘Axe in Afghanistan ’11’

06.04.11
Danger Room: On Pakistan Border, U.S. Troops Launch Their Own Spring Offensive

by DAVID AXE With the signature whoosh and crack of a rocket-propelled grenade, the local Taliban of northern Bermel district made their feelings perfectly clear. After three years without laying eyes on U.S., Afghan, or allied forces, the insurgents of this mountainous border community were saying, unambiguously, that they were not exactly pleased that the [...]

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05.04.11
Danger Room: Epic Border Battle a Bad Sign for Afghanistan

by DAVID AXE Brett Capstick was in bed when it happened. The 22-year-old Army specialist from Ohio awoke to the sound of “screaming, explosions,” he says. It was around 1:20 in the morning on Oct. 30 at a tiny American outpost in Margah, a dusty border town in eastern Paktika province. Capstick’s unit — Fox [...]

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01.04.11
Danger Room: Night Vision Tech Tangles Troops in Afghanistan

Staff Sgt. Andrew Odland and the Afghan police officer were standing just inches apart, looking in the same direction. But what they were seeing was completely different. A brief, contentious patrol in eastern Afghanistan’s Baraki Barak district on March 27 highlighted an important technological gap between U.S. forces and their Afghan partners that will only grow more noticeable as the Americans hand off responsibility to Afghan troops.

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01.04.11
Axeghanistan ’11: From the Czech Republic, with Love

The Czech Provincial Reconstruction Team assigned to Logar, eastern Afghanistan, consults with Afghan National Army officers on the construction of new facilities for the ANA. Meanwhile, the Czech security detail visits the weapons range alongside some American troops.

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31.03.11
Axeghanistan ’11: Detained, and Thrilled about It

On March 25, U.S. Special Forces detained six men in a nighttime raid in Baraki Barak, Logar province, eastern Afghanistan. The next day, Afghan police released four of the men. Here’s what happened.

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30.03.11
Offiziere.ch: In Eastern Afghanistan, Czech Reconstruction Team Gets Mixed Reception

For such a short journey, it sure did cover a lot of ground.

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30.03.11
Axeghanistan ’11: MPs on Patrol

Military Police attached to Charlie Company, 2-30 Infantry, in Baraki Barak, Logar province, Afghanistan, patrol the downtown bazaar alongside Afghan National Police on March 27.

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29.03.11
Danger Room: New Afghanistan Plan: Hole Up in Fortress Districts

With the first American troops slated to withdraw in July, the Afghanistan surge is nearly over. But even as the overall U.S. force in Afghanistan contracts, portions of a handful of particularly important districts — the rough equivalent of U.S. counties — could actually get more troops and more development cash.

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28.03.11
Axeghanistan ’11: Contract Air

Just a bit of Afghanistan eye candy: a video of a routine circuit flight by one of the many private contractors supporting passenger and cargo operations in Logar province — in this case flying old Sikorsky S-61s.

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25.03.11
Axeghanistan ’11: Photos

 by DAVID AXE Click on the photo above to view my current Flickr stream from Afghanistan.

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22.03.11
Danger Room: Troops in Afghanistan Now Use Shovels, Feet to Stop Bombs

With a deadly bomb possibly lying just inches under their feet, any sane person would — oh, I don’t know — run away. But these uniformed madmen have a job to do. They run toward a potential explosive, with nothing but steady hands and body armor to protect them.

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21.03.11
Axeghanistan ’11: Mission to Pakhab-e’Shana

U.S. Army soldiers from 5-25 Field Artillery, plus Jordanian and Afghan troops, visit Pakhab-e’Shana in Logar, Afghanistan on March 20, 2011. The Afghans and Jordanians assessed mosques with an eye to providing refurbishment materials, while the Americans talked to village elders. On the way out of the village, a buried bomb struck an American vehicle, wounding five (not depicted).

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