Archive of May 2010

31.05.10
The War Is Boring Israeli Navy Primer

“At least nine people have been killed after Israeli commandos stormed a convoy of ships carrying aid to the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army says.” This according to the BBC. “Israel says its soldiers were shot at and attacked with bars and knives; the activists say Israeli troops came on board shooting.”

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31.05.10
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31.05.10
U.N. Dispatch: Embedded With Afghan Civil Society, Part Four, the Road to Yakawlang

Leaving Bamiyan city, we drive through what amounts to a slum. The sights are jarring. This is where some of the poorest people in the world scrape out a ragged existence on the edges of a society with little to spare. Destitute families crowd into caves cut out from the rocky cliffs. There is no running water, no electricity, and just a few rudimentary outdoor latrines. The six month Bamiyan winter is often deadly for children and pregnant women living in these caves.

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31.05.10
What Would the U.S. Marines on Okinawa Do?

by KYLE MIZOKAMI So asked the Asahi Shimbum newspaper. The Asahi got back many answers: The most detailed explanation about what the Marines would do was made by U.S. Ambassador John Roos at a speech he gave in January at Tokyo’s Waseda University. “The Marines in Okinawa would play a similar rapid response role in [...]

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30.05.10
U.N. Dispatch: Embedded with Afghan Civil Society, Part Three, Bamiyan City

Bamiyan city is not a city in the developed world sense. It has one commercial street with a rambling bazaar of small shops that sell local silver, carpets, medicine, food and bicycle repair supplies. The tallest buildings in sight are two stories.

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29.05.10
U.N. Dispatch: Embedded with Afghan Civil Society, Part Two, the Long Haul to Bamiyan

Around 8:00 in the morning, we stop in a small village in a mountainous area of Parwan. It’s breakfast time, and we are half-way to Bamiyan City.

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28.05.10
Matt Bors: “One of Them Is Gay … “

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28.05.10
The Diplomat: India’s Greatest Threat?

On the early morning of April 6, the 80 troopers from the Indian Central Reserve Police Force were exhausted. For three days straight, they and a single district policeman had patrolled the thick forests of Chhattisgarh, a state in rural western India. They were on the lookout for fighters from the Naxals, an armed group originating in West Bengal that had split off from the Communist Party of India in 1967. Forty-three years on, senior officials in New Delhi consider the Naxals India’s most serious internal threat.

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28.05.10
Kyle’s Links 5/28/10

by KYLE MIZOKAMI * Angola looks to China for military modernization * Portugal may swap combat troops for MPs and trainers, reduce contingent in Afghanistan * ROK navy holds anti-submarine drills in warning to the North * Police, drug kingpin supporters battle in Kingston, Jamaica * Once-vanquished Ugandan rebel group regrouping in Congo

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27.05.10
U.N. Dispatch: Embedded With Afghan Civil Society, Part One, Leaving Kabul in Darkness

At 3:oo in the morning, Bisharat, AHRDO’s 28-year-old managing director, calls me to say he is close to my house and to be ready when he arrives. The Toyota minibus pulls up outside and I bundle my duvet and duffle bag in the back. Bisharat slams the door shut. “Okay,” he says, “let’s go to Bamiyan!”

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27.05.10
Sam’s Southeast Asia Round-Up

Thailand
Prosecutors have issued an arrest warrant for Thaksin Shinawatra for coordinating the protests. Many of the Red Shirts supported a return of Thaksin, who was ousted in a 2006 coup. Thaksin denied the allegations. “I have never supported violence. … The arrest warrant against me is unfair. I am ready to prove that I am not a terrorist and the accusation is politically motivated.” Jatuporn Prompan, a protest leader, concurred, saying at a court appearance, “I am prepared to explain to the court that core leaders of the Red Shirts were responsible for every move at the rally without any influence from Thaksin.” Another protest leader, Jaran Dithapichai, asserted on the stage at the long-running rally that Mr. Thaksin was among people who had given financial support. The curfew set in place on May 19 for government operations to disperse Red Shirt protesters has been extended.

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27.05.10
U.N. Dispatch: Embedded with Afghan Civil Society

Afghanistan is more than a war, and though violence is spreading, much of the country remains peaceful. Events in Afghanistan seldom make headlines abroad unless they involve violence, fanaticism or government malfeasance. Regrettably little attention is paid to civilian life, which goes on — because it must — in spite of deteriorating security.

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