World Politics Review: Chinese, U.S. Navies Consult on Humanitarian Mission

04.06.09

Categorie: David Axe, Health, Naval, Relief, Southern Partnership Station, USNS Comfort |

web_090411-a-1786s-063.jpg

by DAVID AXE

In April, the U.S. Navy hospital ship Comfort , pictured, sailed from Virginia with 900 doctors, nurses, engineers and civilian volunteers aboard. Comfort‘s mission: to deliver humanitarian aid to seven Latin American countries over a four-month period, “building relations with many countries, and strengthening already-strong bonds,” in the words of mission commander Bob Lineberry, a Navy captain. In the first two months of their tour, Comfort‘s staff treated 29,000 patients, including performing more than 500 surgeries. They also helped rebuild hospitals and conducted medical training with local health professionals.

Operation Continuing Promise is aimed at reinforcing existing U.S. ties with Antigua, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua and Panama — and bolstering those nations’ health infrastructures. In the last three years, the Navy has launched similar “smart power” missions in East and West Africa, and the Pacific. The missions typically entail one of the Navy’s two hospital ships or three-dozen amphibious ships spending four to six months visiting poor countries to render medical, engineering and security assistance.

Most U.S. Navy smart-power missions include participants from other developed countries. Brazil, Canada, France and the Netherlands sent medical personnel to reinforce Comfort‘s American staff. Perhaps most surprisingly, the Chinese navy has requested a consultation during Comfort‘s upcoming stay in Colombia. A Chinese team will board the 70,000-ton-displacement, converted oil tanker for 10 days of training. “They’re putting together a hospital ship, and are interested in how we do our business,” explained Navy Capt. James Ware, senior doctor aboard Comfort.

Read the rest at World Politics Review.

(Photo: DoD)

Related:
Southern Comfort series
Africa Handshake series
Continuing Promise 2008 series

|

6 Responses to “World Politics Review: Chinese, U.S. Navies Consult on Humanitarian Mission”

  1. [...] On his blog, strategist Tom Barnett praised my latest column for World Politics Review — the one on China’s consultation with the U.S. Navy on humanitarian issues. Calling me a “free-ranging Michael Yon with an ‘everything else’-type focus,” Barnett said my column “is worth perusing each week on SysAdmin/DoEE-like subjects. It’s just his natural beat, it seems.” [...]

  2. [...] Related: World Politics Review: Chinese, U.S. Navies Consult on Humanitarian Mission Africa Handshake series Continuing Promise 2008 series 1 Comment so far Leave a comment [...]

  3. [...] Related: World Politics Review: Chinese, U.S. Navies Consult on Humanitarian Mission Africa Handshake series Continuing Promise 2008 series No Comments so far Leave a comment RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI Leave a comment Line and paragraph breaks automatic, e-mail address never displayed, HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong> [...]

  4. [...] Read the rest here: World Politics Review: Chinese, US Navies Consult on Humanitarian … Tags: april-, latin, Politics, virginia, with-900 Politics [...]

  5. [...] Related: World Politics Review: Chinese, U.S. Navies Consult on Humanitarian Mission Africa Handshake series Continuing Promise 2008 series 6 Comments so far Leave a comment [...]

  6. [...] Related: Southern Comfort series World Politics Review: Chinese, U.S. Navies Consult on Humanitarian Mission Africa Handshake series Continuing Promise 2008 series No Comments so far Leave a comment RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI Leave a comment Line and paragraph breaks automatic, e-mail address never displayed, HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong> [...]

Leave a Reply