The Washington Monthly: Coast Guard’s Sunk Costs

25.11.08

Categorie: Industry, Naval |

081112-g-0694d-216.JPG

More than a decade ago, the Coast Guard came up with a plan, called Deepwater, to replace aging vessels like Dallas with new cutters, at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. But in the feverish aftermath of 9/11, with the Bush administration eager to turn all government departments into outposts of the war on terror, the humble Coast Guard attempted a far more ambitious transformation — a $24 billion scheme to transform its boats into an integrated fleet boasting heavy weaponry and futuristic communications systems. When the agency leapt at the opportunity to get its hands on an expanded budget and high-tech ships, however, it failed to put in place the necessary tools to make sure that such massive contracts would actually deliver what the government ordered. The result has been six years of incompetence and alleged fraud by private contractors and billions of squandered taxpayer money, much of it wasted on flawed boats that have since been scrapped. The Coast Guard, meanwhile, is still attempting to play a growing military role with ships that are old, unreliable, and a hazard to their crews.

Read the whole story at The Washington Monthly.

(Photo: Coast Guard)

Related:
Coast Guard’s billions
Congress wants to take away CG’s buying power
Coasties in Georgia
Coasties to the rescue!
Behind the Coast Guard’s rescue spin
Coast Guard spins rescue
Cutters got leaky networks
Coast Guard slams contractors
What’s next for Deepwater?
Coast Guard sinking ever faster
Deepwater: the good and the bad
Lockheed’s bad boats

|

2 Responses to “The Washington Monthly: Coast Guard’s Sunk Costs”

  1. [...] Related: Coast Guard lawsuit Coast Guard’s sunk costs Coast Guard’s billions Congress wants to take away CG’s buying power Coasties in Georgia Coasties to the rescue! Behind the Coast Guard’s rescue spin Coast Guard spins rescue Cutters got leaky networks Coast Guard slams contractors What’s next for Deepwater? Coast Guard sinking ever faster Deepwater: the good and the bad Lockheed’s bad boats No Comments so far Leave a comment RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI Leave a comment Line and paragraph breaks automatic, e-mail address never displayed, HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong> [...]

  2. [...] * The Coast Guard’s desperate struggle to reform its bureaucracy. [...]

Leave a Reply