Sats Spot Burma Human Rights Abuses (Addendum)

02.10.07

Categorie: Ideas, Space |

0928burma_report.jpgLast week I reported how commercial satellites were helping human rights groups spot government abuses in Burma (new army encampment pictured). Some readers worried that space-based imagery was too easy to fake or misinterpret. As it turns out, the imagery specialists from the American Association for the Advancement of Science team up with Burmese spotters on the ground. World Politics Review has more:

[Aung] Din’s people relay the coordinates of potential trouble spots. [Lars] Bromley’s team bids for satellite time. The resulting imagery — if not spoiled by cloud cover or fast-growing vegetation — is compared to years-old archives of imagery in order to perform “change-detection,” a tactic also employed by military reconnaissance experts looking for evidence of hidden weapons, moving vehicles or recently buried bombs. AAAS prepares the findings for distribution in the form of paper reports or electronic press releases.

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3 Responses to “Sats Spot Burma Human Rights Abuses (Addendum)”

  1. Free Burma! says:

    Free Burma!
    International Bloggers’ Day for Burma on the 4th of October

    International bloggers are preparing an action to support the peaceful revolution in Burma. We want to set a sign for freedom and show our sympathy for these people who are fighting their cruel regime without weapons. These Bloggers are planning to refrain from posting to their blogs on October 4 and just put up one Banner then, underlined with the words „Free Burma!“.

    http://www.free-burma.org

  2. [...] Whale-Detecting Cameras Might Spot Bad Guys in Jungles Aug 25 Diesel Tech News from around the net! The “all-seeing” eyes of the world’s most advanced military forces really aren’t that all-seeing. Even with the rapid advancements in drones, radars, infrared and electro-optical sensors and “change-detecting” computer algorithms, it’s still possible to hide, using tried-and-true methods. In tropical regions, hiding under jungle canopies is still a great way to avoid being seen. Two years ago, the American Association for the Advancement of Science tried to use satellites to track human-rights abuses in Burma, but dense tree cover made it necessary to send in human spotters to verify what the satellites appeared to see. [...]

  3. [...] The “all-seeing” eyes of the world’s most advanced military forces really aren’t that all-seeing. Even with the rapid advancements in drones, radars, infrared and electro-optical sensors and “change-detecting” computer algorithms, it’s still possible to hide, using tried-and-true methods. In tropical regions, hiding under jungle canopies is still a great way to avoid being seen. Two years ago, the American Association for the Advancement of Science tried to use satellites to track human-rights abuses in Burma, but dense tree cover made it necessary to send in human spotters to verify what the satellites appeared to see. [...]

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